Supersize My Geocache – The Biggest of BIG Caches

Ahhhhhh. Every geocacher knows the satisfaction of spotting that ammo can, prying the lid open, and climbing inside.

Wait. What?

Big Ammo Can B&J

Geocaching team benandjayme at GC4RPG8.

That’s right, folks. This geocache in Washington state, also known as GC4RPG8, is totally real, totally not photoshopped, and totally cool. And it isn’t going to be lost anytime soon.

Big—and we mean BIG—geocaches are a whole new type of geocaching fun, for a few very big reasons.

1. The element of surprise

A good geocache container has the finder saying, “WOAH.” A great geocache container has the finder saying “WOAH” and then mass-texting all the other geocachers she knows a photo of it. Creative geocaches don’t always have to be sneaky small, tricky to open, or intricately built. Sometimes they just need to be really, really big.

2. No trackables left behind. 

Ever pick up a trackable that’s just too big for any other geocaches? Those days are over, my friend, once you find a Big Cache. Big geocaches don’t discriminate by size—though you may still have a hard time parking your trackable car.

3. Sign your name, write a novel.

No need to squeeze your ‘caching name into a strip of paper smaller than your finger…with the logbooks in Big Caches, you won’t be mincing your words. Anybody have War and Peace memorized?

4. Photo opportunities like no other.

A picture is worth a thousand words. Here are seven thousand words.

  • Just taking a break on GC3F3CW.
  • GC1DC55, or “Rat Trap”
  • GCXCEX, or “Bridge Boutique”, in Ontario.
  • Typical “Where is it?!” moment at GC15RQB.
  • “Haksulandia”, or GC16QCH, in Finland.
  • A cache the whole family can fit in! GC2Y8Q8.

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GC1DC55, or “Rat Trap”

9c619059-c555-43ee-8704-978867166bf7

GC38N61 is swag-tastic!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes, it’s not The geocache itself that’s big, but the structure that’s been built around the cache. We applaud those makers whose creativity knows know bounds, who moonlight as engineers, carpenters, and blacksmiths.

GCXCEX, or “Bridge Boutique”, in Ontario.

What’s the draw for a cache owner to make a Big Cache? Well, geocachers will often come from far and wide in order to find a Big Cache, often with oversized trackables and buckets of swag. A Big Cache done well can draw a range of visitors dropping favorite points left and right.

Then there’s the logbook, which, since there’s no restriction to its size in a big cache, can be a lot of fun to sign.

The logbook is in here somewhere...

The logbook is in here somewhere…

There’s something about walking up to a big geocache, and knowing that nobody in the world but a geocacher really knows what it is. Take this featured Geocache of the Week: to a muggle (non-geocacher) walking by, this is merely a beautifully constructed forest restroom.

The geocacher sees it as the final in a truly awesome multi-cache. Because that’s exactly what it is.

Das Vergessene Portal

Das Vergessene Portal

It’s easy to find geocaches near you using the new Advanced Search. Premium Members can filter by size to suss out large geocaches near their home coordinates. Check back soon to see some really BIG trackables!

Share the BIGGEST Big Cache you’ve ever found, and the words you used to describe it to friends?

 

 

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